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Sustainability

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This page contains comments posted by members of the Cornell community pertaining to Sustainability.

Budget

Suggestion
Dear President Skorton,
Thank you for taking considerate and necessary actions to reduce negative impacts of the financial crisis on our Cornell community.
However, I am surprised that you do not mention the great opportunity to combine the financial crisis with the urgency and commitment to Cornell’s sustainability efforts. Just by taking all possible steps to reduce energy waste and to improve energy efficiency, Cornell could save millions of dollars. Investments towards building insulation and renewable energies would in the long run increase Cornell’s savings.
I realize that Cornell is one of the most outstanding US universities in the area of sustainability. But we all still lack the true committment that is needed to avoid the worst.
Newest research by the German climatologist John Schellnhuber indicates that with 400 ppm we have a 20% chance that we do NOT reach the limit of a global warming of 2 Celsius. 20%! Imagine that probability of a potential global catastrophe! If warming is higher, tipping points are likely not avoidable any more. We are currently at 287 ppm, with a 3 ppm increase each year.
We just do not have time to put efforts towards sustainability on hold; not for any amount of time. As bad as the financial crisis is, the crisis ahead will be much worse if we now fail to do anything we can to reduce our emissions.
I have one specific suggestion how to increase the amount of money available for sustainability efforts at Cornell:
Discourage the amount of travel, offer more localities that enable video-conferencing, and “punish” travels by implementing a mandatory CO2 offset for each travel - money that will go into a fund at Cornell that will invest into renewable energies and building renovation.
Also, a campus-wide competition for the fastest and steepest reductions of CO2 emissions might help stimulate more involvement by the entire Cornell community, making it not only a necessary evil to save energy, but fun.
Thank you, and with deep respect - Maiken

Conserve Energy

Suggestion
In 2008, Cornell installed TWO ELECTRIC WATERFALLS in the middle of campus. One is on Tower Rd across from Uris, the other in the odd looking object sticking out of the ground in front of Bailey. This was done in a year when sustainability was announced as a research thrust.
It is difficult to imagine anyone thinking that we don’t have sufficient SOLAR POWERED WATERFALLS on campus and in Ithaca, but apparently we don’t. So we use lots of electricity to pump water up hill so it falls. Remarkable.
Drain them and plant flowers. - Tom
Suggestion
I often see that even when the libraries are closed, the buildings are brightly lit. Is that a necessary safety precaution of some sort?
Won’t reducing lighting when not necessary save energy and money? - Satyaki
Suggestion
I am concerned that so many students rent individual fridges and microwaves for their rooms. Fridges use a huge amount of electricity — This is particularly wasteful when we have common area kitchens/lounges on almost every floor in the residence halls. Along with this as a sustainability issue, I believe this practice works against our attempts to build community. Having to come out of their room to get a drink, yogurt, fruit - the student likely would run into a hallmate, classmate — rather than being isolated and self-sufficient in their room by themselves. - Donna
Suggestion
I end my teaching day in the late afternoon and I always pass empty classrooms with the lights still on. I doubt that my building is an isolated case. We need a concerted campaign to get people to take the very simple step of turning off classroom lights unless they see that another class is waiting to enter. - Sara
Suggestion
I suggest that Campus Life give students the ability to adjust the radiators in their dorms (in finer settings than On and Off). While it may theoretically be more efficient to maintain a balmy temperature, I know that at least four out of six people in my suite open their windows (wide) to let some of the suffocating heat escape. The energy wasted is twofold: not only does the heat escape, but also this heat was probably powered from a coal plant. - Anonymous
Suggestion
There are numerous data centers across campus that consume hundreds of kilowatts and combined equal thousands (megawatts). The heat energy from these rooms could be diverted into the building system to supplement the heating needs of the building. Currently more energy is being used to cool these rooms for safe operation. The new computers are specified to operate up to 90 degrees F. and are not as sensitive as they used to be. These clusters are running 24/7 and should be viewed as a source of heat that could be used elsewhere when needed. During the summer and warmer days of spring and fall the rooms could simply be vented because it is clean electrically generated heat - instead of expending more energy in trying to cool them back down. - Anonymous
Suggestion
For economic, environmental, and even well-being to some, Cornell may want to take a look at what some would consider to be over-lighting. When maintenance came to our office some eight months ago, they planned to replace all burnt-out lighting in our office. We asked them to please not, but instead just to replace one bulb that we really felt we needed. We currently have about 1/3 of our overhead lighting out of use. Not only is all of the lighting in our office unnecessary, it has actually caused headaches among some of us. I understand not all people may feel the same way, but many I have talked to do, so this could be a source of energy and cost savings, as well as a welcome change for the work environment for some. - Sarah
Suggestion
It might be a good idea to distribute posters everywhere in the buildings to turn heat or A/C off when you go home and turn lights off when nobody is in the room for more than 30 minutes. - Manfred
Suggestion
Close fume hoods in labs while not in use and/or install self-closing hoods in new construction. - Linda
Suggestion
Could we get more energy efficient vending machines around campus? When I’ve worked off-hours I hear the vending machines near my office humming very loudly and it seems there may be machines that could have motion detectors to turn on when people are near and power down all other times. - Linda
Suggestion
I think that this is a sustainability as well as financial saving
There are windows on in so many buildings in the evening on campus. Maybe they could be turned off after a certain time to save electricity and money. - Susan
Suggestion
Dear President Skorton,
I recently attended a department faculty meeting where our chair discussed a plan to cut our department’s budget by 10% due to the economic crisis. I think this is also an opportunity to save money by making a 10% reduction in Cornell’s energy use through measures to increase efficiency. There is a lot of low-hanging fruit in this regard. For example, I have a window air conditioning unit that creates a draft of cold air from outside during winter. This makes my office extremely cold and I have to use a highly inefficient space heater to function in my office. I had to make three requests to the Cornell bureaucracy before the air conditioning unit was removed and put in storage for this winter. This took about 15 minutes for the carpentry shop. I have also noticed other colleagues using space heaters. If you made it a priority to reduce energy use by 10%, I think there is a lot that can be done relatively easy while saving money. For instance, the need for space heaters should be phased out. Anyone using a space heater should be asked to call or e-mail to have their situation looked at to see if there is some easy way to solve the problem. In my case, there was; it just was not a priority. By undertaking a concerted effort to reduce energy use by 10%, we can save money in these difficult times while moving towards your laudable goal of carbon neutrality.
Respectfully,
Rajesh
Suggestion
Dear President Skorton,
There is a new company that manufactures solar panels that look like ivy and also generate wind power as they move in the wind. They are an innovative way to harbor both wind and solar power without creating an eyesore. The panels can be installed on the sides of buildings, and would add a nice “ivy touch” to our beautiful campus while improving our sustainability efforts.
Here is the website, but it is a little outdated:
http://www.s-m-i-t.com/#grow_target
I know the partners in the company and would be glad to get you in touch with them if you want to know more about the product or company.
Thanks for your time!
Best,
Liz
Suggestion
We sent our son off to Cornell this fall with a quilt and wondering whether one or two extra blankets later on would be needed. Astonishingly, we learned that he’s still sleeping with only a sheet (and it’s mid-December!). Having grown up in a household with 66 daytime and 55 nighttime temperatures in the winter, it was quite a surprise. If there are temperature controls in the rooms, he’s unaware of them (and thus student education about them would be an excellent idea). In any case, there’s clearly room for significant energy savings by lowering the dorm room temperatures during the day (it’s surely not too much to have students wearing sweaters instead of shirtsleeves in their rooms in the winter), and lowering them further at night (surely using blankets at night in the winter makes sense). I wasn’t sure what category to choose for this suggestion, since it seems to fit in all four. - Anonymous
Suggestion
Revisit the windmill option up on Mt. Pleasant. By bowing to the NIMBI folks in 2005, Cornell missed out on a golden opportunity to reap energy and PR benefits by using wind mills for energy. Cornell would have been hailed as an innovative and cutting edge university, if they had not caved into the NIMBI protesters, which effectively shut down the Wind Mill proposal.
The gas line has been an environmental disaster-the amount of destruction of farm land and forest land to put that that line in is amazing. Plus plowing through all those wet soils, some that may be classified as wet lands. And let’s not even mention go across the various creeks that feed into Cascadilla Creek that feeds into Cayuga Lake! Let’s go with the wind mill option and be hailed nationally as innovators! - Bill
Suggestion
This is another suggestion about lighting. As has been suggested, there are many rooms throughout the campus which remain with the lights on all day no matter whether some is using it. This applies to classrooms during the nights for example, but also to other rooms which are used sparingly during the day but keep their lights on, like for example the kitchens in many departments. An easy fix is to install motion detectors so that the lights turn on automatically when someone enters and stay on while there is still movement in the room, and then turn off after there is no more movement.
Another thing that could help is to install more light switches, allowing to control individual lights. When I entered today the room where my desk is, 30 fluorescent tubes turned on (there is a motion detector here), though there is no one else here today and I need no more than 3 to be able to work. - Anonymous
Suggestion
All the computers in the public computer labs are on at all times. Desktop computers draw down a good amount of power even when no one is using them. Since the computers are set to restart every hour anyway, they could also be set to go to sleep after they restart. A machine comes back from sleep in a few seconds, and this would result in considerable energy savings when labs are not being heavily used, as the sleep mode only draws a nominal amount of power. They would also be set back to the unchanged state as usual. To make sure more computers are going to sleep, the restart cycle time could even be shortened to 30 minutes instead of 1 hour. - David
Suggestion
Re-construct the university hydro power electricity generation system from Beebe Lake. - Howard
Suggestion
As a student assistant in a university library, I can say that it is rather unfortunate that most libraries LEAVE LIGHTS AND COMPUTERS ON AT NIGHT. Student assistants taking the closing shift could do this as part of their job, and those taking the morning shift can turn them on again as our tasks are minimal at most. - Diana
Suggestion
Automatic light switches with sensors that turn off when nobody is present.
Programmable thermostats, automatically programmed to go down on evenings and weekends.
Automatic shutoff valves on heater units under windows that shut off when window is open. Or, bolt windows shut.
Set printers to print double-sided automatically.
Eliminate water coolers — tap water is fine.
Ask people not to use personal-sized heaters in shared offices during summer (!!), but to adjust thermostat instead.
Install solar panels on buildings. - Julia
Suggestion
Consider replacing the windows on the older buildings with more energy-efficient ones. I work in a lab in Upson. There is a very noticeable temperature gradient across the room and it gets pretty drafty around the workstations near the windows. The wind can often be heard whistling quite loudly through the windows, leading me to suspect they may not be air-tight.
This not only makes for a rather uncomfortable working environment, but also wastes a considerable amount of money and energy. - Jed
Suggestion
Cornell has extensive areas in the sides and tops of buildings that can be used to put solar panels. Also some buildings are too hot in the winter and too cold in the summer, this should be monitored and regulated. - Alejandro
Suggestion
I share a space with three other colleagues in Rockefeller Hall. There is one window in the entire room, which is near our Administrative Manager. I am about 15 feet from the window. We have an air conditioner in the window year-round. While I am not suggesting to remove the air conditioner (the summer’s are brutal on the 3rd floor of Rockefeller), but in the off months, especially now, you can feel the wind whipping through to the point of staff turning on space heaters to keep warm, as it can be freezing in the office. This is utterly ridiculous and a waste of energy. Isn’t there a way to reduce this waste that would be cost effective down the road? - Anonymous
Suggestion
I live in High Rise 5 and I notice that the lights in the RPCC dining remain on throughout the night and into the early morning. I’m sure it’s a huge waste of energy and money. - Anonymous
Suggestion
I think the university should promote to the Cornell Community and particiapte in Earth Hour 2009. I personally don’t think this should be a once-a-year practice, it seems that once a month would really make an impact. Selecting the first Saturday or last Saturday every month, keeping it consistent.
On Saturday, March 28, 2009, at 8:30 pm, I am taking part in Earth Hour-a global event in which millions of people will turn out their lights to make a statement of concern about our planet and climate change. I want to invite you to join, too! Sponsored by World Wildlife Fund, Earth Hour got started just two years ago and is now the largest event of its kind in the world. Last year, more than 50 million participated and the lights went out at the Empire State Building, the Golden Gate Bridge, the Sydney Opera House and the Coliseum in Rome, just to name a few. Even Google’s homepage went black for the day! In Israel, President Shimon Peres personally turned off lights in Tel Aviv.
This year, Earth Hour will be even bigger-already 250 cities in 74 countries have agreed to take part including Atlanta, Chicago, Las Vegas, Los Angeles, Miami and Nashville with more signing up every day. Around the world cities like Moscow, Hong Kong, Mumbai, Shanghai and Mexico City will turn out their lights.
But Earth Hour isn’t just for big cities-anyone can participate. To get a better sense of the event, check out this video at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BjWD8pbK5t8.
Participating in Earth Hour is easy, fun and free. I hope you will join me for this amazing event. To sign up, visit http://www.earthhourUS.org where you’ll learn more including ways you can spread the word about Earth Hour, plus creative things to do when the lights go out in case you need inspiration!
We want the US to turn out more lights than any other country in the world during this historic event so please pass this note along to anyone you think might want to take part. Let’s all turn out and take action on March 28 at 8:30 pm. - Julie
Suggestion
Monday morning, March 23. Outside temperature below freezing with a huge wind chill.
Alfalfa room, Warren Hall: the air conditioners are running, set at 68!
This is just stupid! I turn one off. The cafe worker turns it on again.
3 radiators were off, but one had a feed pipe too hot to touch.
Same on March 25. I ask the worker why not just open the window if you are too hot (I think the temperature is fine). I am told the air does not circulate enough from the open window (even though the windows are recent and quite large).
I award the Alfalfa room staffperson the award of energy waster of the year!
Clearly nothing will change until a directive is issued not to use air conditioners in windowed rooms until the outside temperature goes above 70! - Peter
Suggestion
Why are lights at athletics facilities so often on when no one is on the field or in the building??? What a waste of energy and money and it adds to light pollution. What a glaring (if you will pardon the pun) example of waste to both students and community.
I don’t know how much energy those huge lights over Schoellkopf Field, Alumni Fields, etc. use, or how much it costs to keep them lit, but it has to add up. I live 2 miles from campus and the lights are clearly visibile from there! - Anonymous
Suggestion
We could encourage faculty and staff to use common printers situated in department offices and those of their administrative assistants. In my department many faculty have laser printers in their offices which use a lot of power, are expensive to operate, and are frankly not necessary except as status symbols. Besides, there are real health benefits to walking around occasionally during the day. A 15 second walk down the hall just doesn’t seem like a big deal. - Anonymous
Suggestion
I live near the Lab of Ornithology and have noticed that the lights in those parking lots are on late into the night (and perhaps all night long). I know that the lots do need to be lit to some degree for safety purposes, but it would be neat to light half of them every other night - the bulbs would last longer, it would be less of a disturbance for the sanctuary, and some money would be saved. - Anonymous
Suggestion
I’ve seen a lot of suggestions on this list for energy conservation projects (replacing windows, fixing radiators, etc.) that would certainly save money in the long term, but involve an initial capital investment that may not be available given the current shortfall.
Perhaps costing out these projects and promoting them to alums and donors as part of the university’s development activities would be a way to generate revenue to carry them out. Allowing donors to specifically designate their donations to support green initiatives at Cornell could give folks one more reason to support the university. - Anonymous
Suggestion
There has been a lot of discussion lately about the lights being left on all night in Rockefeller Hall, with suggestions that students be hired to turn them off. Another option would be to install motion detectors, as has been done in parts of Uris Hall. Some hall lights (some will need to be on at all times for safety), and all classroom and bathroom lights could be set to turn off if no motion is detected for a set period of time. Not only would this save energy, it would mean that someone entering a bathroom or classroom after dark wouldn’t have to hunt for a light switch. The switch can be over-ridden if you need darkness, e.g., to use a projector. - Anonymous
Suggestion
Frequently when I leave the office during a bright afternoon I find the stadium lights fully illuminated. The 160 lamps at 1500 watts each would consume 240 kilowatts - an absurd waste of energy just to supplement natural daylight FREQUENTLY DURING DAYS WHEN FULL SUNSHINE IS PRESENT. 240 kW is enough electrical energy to provide power to 100 - 200 homes; Cornell’s entire Duffield Hall research facility - one of the heaviest electrical loads on campus - uses only 950 kW average. Minimizing such supplemental lighting needs during the night is a good plan but to utilize it during hours of daylight is not the example we should be setting. I bet the folks who turn on those lights don’t pay for the energy use and I would bet that if folks did have to pay for their energy usage from their own budgets Cornell would magically consume far less energy. - Mark
Suggestion
My suggestion also applies to energy efficiency, financial savings, and reducing Cornell’s carbon footprint.
I assumed a new position and now work in Day Hall for Public Affairs. I now have a window, which is great. However, the cold air pours in on windy days and heat is lost everyday, because there are no storm windows installed and only a single pane of glass between the inside and outside. This is of course not unusual for older buildings and homes, or offices like Day Hall.
However, in my own home, I had an energy audit several years ago through a local company. Since then I have been saving money and energy by using inexpensive but fitted plexiglass covers over the windows that do not have storm windows. The fitted plexiglass is installed easily on the inside. I also use honeycomb blinds to provide additional insulation on most of my windows.
This would be a big help at Day Hall, which ideally would showcase the kinds of sustainable efforts that are possible in old buildings. It also, of course, saves the university heating costs, and reduces the carbon footprint. - Diane

Construction

Suggestion
I was pleased to hear about the construction pause. This is an unprecedented opportunity to look at construction across campus and to ensure that it is being done in a thoughtful and sustainable way. In particular, Cornell should require that all construction is reviewed for possible LEED certification or in accordance with LEED practice (while not always possible with renovation, it should be a must with new construction). This will pay off long into the future. Contractors should be held accountable for reuse of materials whereever possible, reducing waste on the construction site, energy management (no letting vehicles run for hours, lights off when done for the day), etc. If they lower their costs, Cornell should save too. Construction contracts should be written to reward sustainable actions and penalize practices that are not sustainable (we have enough skills on this campus to come up with a common checklist that could be used with every project). Cornell can also be innovative, using student class projects to provide landscape design and implementation, saving money on the cost of hiring landscapers, incorporating more sustainable design into landscaping classes (more perennials!) and giving students hands on experience and the pride of seeing a lasting culmination of their studies. - Emily

Expenses and Purchasing

Suggestion
Could we hold a campus-wide (or by quad or college) swap for extra office supplies? Gannett does this annually.It would be a great way to get rid of extras and get needed items at no cost. - Beth

Financial Aid

No suggestions yet.

Funding

Suggestion
I am a graduate of the NYSC Veterinary Medicine 1989. I would like to suggest that the university consider fund raising as an Affiliate with local electric company called Ambit.
I know there are non-profit organizations (and for profit businesses) in New York state which have done quite well.
The university would get a web site such as www.cornell.joinambit.com and households would change their electric in the name of the university. It is a win-win as the consumer saves a small bit as well.
Please phone me with questions. I am able to set this up.
Sincerely, Roberta

General

Suggestion
Register University-wide faxes to “do not call” to minimize wasted paper & toner.
Print drafts in toner saving mode & double-sided.
Print only hand-outs or documents that are not widely accessible electronically (i.e. Filemaker files; which actually can even be converted to excel).
Streamline procedures to disregard procedures that are done “because they’ve always been done,” but provide no added benefit.
Install energy-saving bulbs & dim lights in halls, restrooms, etc.
Turn computer off at the end of the day.
Be open to change! - Anie
Suggestion
Folks should reduce their signature on emails to a minimum number of lines/characters and not include their signature at all unless it is absolutely necessary for business. It is a huge waste of paper/toner when printing these documents.
Be diligent about turning off lights when leaving (offices, bathrooms, storage rooms, dorm rooms, etc.) whenever possible and equipment (computers, printers, fax machines, scanners, etc.) when leaving for the day. Remind others to do the same.
Every little bit helps! - Barbara
Suggestion
I would like to make two suggestions that I think would add to the University’s mission of sustainability while reducing costs and decreasing waste.
My first suggestion is adding “Occupancy Sensors” to the various classrooms and offices on campus. I have noticed they are currently being used in the some of the restrooms on campus and I would love to see their use expanded to other areas of the campus to decrease the amount of electricity that is wasted b/c lights have been left on unintentionally in an unoccupied room.
Secondly, I would like to see more recycling containers for the disposal of glass bottles and plastics (i.e., plastic water and juice bottles, lunch containers, silverware, cups, etc.). We currently collect our recyclables in our office and someone takes them home every few weeks. - Anonymous
Suggestion
I suspect we could cut costs on air-conditioning in many buildings. It blows full blast during several months, even when the weather is not particularly hot outside. Also, we should review carefully the cost of design, merchandising, etc. of “Cornell items” sold (for the most part)at the Cornell store. While it is normal (or is it?) for an Ivy League U. “to promote the brand”, 80% of “Cornell items” don’t sell. I haven’ seen ONE student wearing the “Ezra Cornell tee-shirt,” and I doubt many alumni use Cornell bougeoirs. Finally, I don’t see the necessity for big “information”- or TV screens in University buildings (such as the Cornell store, again, the Olin Library building, etc.). - Anonymous
Suggestion
No leaf blowing, please.
Designate meadow areas on campus with no mowing (only around parameter.)
Mow lawns less frequently.
Get TCAT to stop drivers from idling the buses.
Cut travel budgets and have departments prioritize and decrease travel - financial savings for CU and good for the environment. Encourage web conferencing and teleconferencing instead.
Voice over IP for the whole university (we’re not doing that yet, are we?) - Anonymous
Suggestion
I work in the grounds dept. and every Monday after commencement we help clean the stadium. The amount of plastic water bottles that are handed out is staggering. I realize that we collect them for recycling but it seems like handing out that much plastic is irresponsible in today’s climate where sustainability is the most highly used phrase since Y2K.
Is it too much to ask that people bring their own water if the weather might warrant it? A large number of the bottles left on the floor of the stadium are unopened anyway. It probably takes a lot of energy to recycle that many unopened bottles.
An idea that I came up with this week while trimming ivy could help the campus in a couple ways. I was working at plant science cutting some English Ivy that had grown into the mortar of a wall and the stone sill on top of that wall. I was approached by a gentleman whose name I unfortunately didn’t get. I believe he was a professor of Horticulture.
His concern with the ivy we were cutting was that it was used as an instructional tool once it had reached and grown over the top of the wall. The rooftop of this building was easily accessible and students could get a very good look at the ivy for studying.
That got me thinking that maybe “we” could construct Walls of Learning that could be overgrown with ivy with no risk of structural damage to a building. Not only would this provide more ivy for research, but it would increase the “green” space of the campus slightly. - Nate
Suggestion
I think that Cornell Catering needs to find ways to work around any liability or other issues regarding what to do with leftover food from events. Time and time again food is wasted when it could be put to other uses. For example, at a catered event where the food is monitored closely, any leftover foods could potentially be donated to a local soup kitchen or something. The food has already been paid for and would otherwise be sent to compost. Can’t we help out the community? - Erin
Suggestion
Make all dining halls trayless. Trayless dining has been adopted at a number of colleges. They report that this drastically reduces the amount of wasted/discarded food, causing both cost-savings and sustainability benefits. - Anonymous
Suggestion
I think it is conventional management thinking to reduce budgets and layoff people in this climate. I believe we can draw down on the endowment until the economic climate changes again -which it will. I think services and programs that are important should be continued. If they are not continued now then they should have been eliminated anyway even in a budget surplus environment.
I believe we have to faith in ourselves and our country and as FDR said we “ the only thing we have to fear is fear itself”. I wish we had leaders at Cornell and American business that have the faith that we ( Americans) will be productive and innovative without cutting back budgets and impacting peoples lives negatively. The investor class can wait for the American economy to recover. These times are a call to be mindful of change and how we will affect it positively. Cornell has the financial strength to go full steam ahead and to be courageous.
I would like to hear more from Cornell on how the community is going to be innovative and turn the tide and embrace change. A 10 % productivity change is a lot of budget dollars. There are many brilliant minds at Cornell and if we were work together we can come up with many solutions to the challenges that Cornell and the American society faces. We now have a American President who is open to new ideas and he believes- yes we can. - Kevin
Suggestion
Cornell Dining should remove trays from all on-campus eateries effective immediately. This would reduce trash disposal fees without delay and it would also necessitate fewer paid hours for the cleanup dining staff following a meal. - Anonymous
Suggestion
Eliminate as much as possible water vending machines and the sale of plastic water bottles across campus: install more water fountains if needed and encourage the use of personal containers.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/asia-pacific/8141569.stm - Anonymous

Human Resources

No suggestions yet.

Increasing Revenue

No suggestions yet.

Information and Technology

No suggestions yet.

Landscaping

Suggestion
Quit salting the sidewalks so vigorously, especially along Tower Road. It is much more than necessary, and the constant cycle of salting in the winter and re-planting grass all spring and summer is a waste of time and resources, and it just seems silly! (I know it is probably to prevent lawsuits from people slipping in the winter, but with resources as tight as they are, eventually people are going to have to get used to the fact that winter happens.) Also, gravel on paths lasts all year, while salt has to be re-applied every morning, and kills the grass to boot. - Sarah
Suggestion
Topic: Cornell Landscaping wastefulness and carelessness.
Issues:
- vehicle used by landscaping crews often oversized, driven carelessly, resulting in enormous damage to vegetation, especially lawns and tree roots. Install strict oversight of all landscaping (and construction!!) efforts on campus.
- overzealous removal of fall foliage depletes soil, especially under shrubbery, trees. Limit Fall foliage removal to main lawns and roadways.
- Cornell Landscaping frequently replants ares that are not in need of replanting, or replants areas that soon will enter construction, example: shrubbery along entry to S.T. Olin from University Ave (North Entrance).
- Cornell landscaping indulges in over-ambitious projects that incur long-term maintenance costs. Example: raised walkway, lawn and creeping shrubbery Northwest of the new Life Sciences Building (between Seeley Mudd, Tower Road and the Life Sciences Center), shrubbery North of the addition to Schoellkopf Hall. - Frank
Suggestion
Trading those leaf blowers for good old rakes would have several benefits: less air and noise pollution, improved worker health, reduced equipment costs, reduced fuel costs, reduced CO2 emissions. Why do our grounds crews use use these obnoxiously loud and stinky things when rakes have done a perfectly fine job for centuries? - Robert
Suggestion
For both sustainability, biodiversity and efficiency, I would encourage making a commitment to native plant landscaping if Cornell hasn’t already done so. Dr. Doug Tallamy just released a book called “Bringing Nature Home” that highlights the ecological value of native plantings. They can also make sense economically in the long run, as upkeep might not be as intense. Cornell’s campus already has wonderful natural resources like Beebe lake, but if one is going to spend money on landscaping why not do so in a ecologically-friendly way. Many ornamentals -although pretty- do not bear nectar as natives plants do, which is a resource that supports butterflies, birds and insects. Many native plants are perennial, so money does not need to be reinvested to purchase new plants each year, and mixtures can be made so that at least a few are in bloom all growing season. - Mia
Suggestion
Plants get pulled up and discarded before it seems necessary. I’ve noticed this often at the Cornell entrance from Rt 366. - Bethany
Suggestion
Cornell uses ridiculous amounts of salt every winter on the paths around campus. This is not only wasteful in itself, but also kills the grass next to the sidewalks and paths. Then in the spring, Cornell spends a lot of time, money, and energy trying to regrow this grass (with limited success). Why not cut down on the salt and just admit that grass isn’t going to grow in certain areas? - Kendra
Suggestion
Raise cutting heights for all lawns in our outlying areas 4” to 6” and extent our mowing cycle a week or longer depending on locations. - Pete
Suggestion
Return to a central receiving warehouse system to get these very large tractor and trailers off the core of our campus - it seems they do more damage to our landscape by cutting corners and jumping curbs. this requires constant repair of lawns, broken branches on trees and tracking of mud onto our streets. when we do these repairs and cleanups with frequency it takes away time to commit to detailed campus landscape not to mention the extra fuel and limited resources. - Anonymous
Suggestion
Close down 20–25% of our sidewalks for winter maintenance, many of our walks parallel one another or it only takes a few more minutes extra to get from point A to B. this could reduce salt usage, less fuel for de-icing/plowing and divert valuable time that could be spent on higher priority areas that more faculty/staff/students utilize. Also a savings could be realized in the Spring on lawn repairs. - Anonymous
Suggestion
all tent vendors that come to campus should have matting to place down as they drive heavy trucks and equipment across our lawns to minimize turf damage and need for constant repair. - Anonymous
Suggestion
Compost the raked leaves to use in gardens on campus. Perhaps this is already being done. - Susann
Suggestion
Cornell should look into less costly and environmentally unfriendly alternatives to much of the grass on campus, pretty as it may be.
Also, has anyone considered the feasibility of devoting some of the landscaping space on campus to growing local food for the food pantry or dining halls? - Ivy
Suggestion
Landscaping. I notice the aesthetic (but costly in terms of staff and plants) practice of changing with the seasons. Spring annuals are planted and then later pulled up to be replaced by summer flowers to be pulled up and replaced by fall bloomers. Why not consider exchanging many of the annuals in the beds for perennials? Talk about sustainability—the plants take care of that themselves. - Anonymous

Personnel

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Recycling

Suggestion
why buy bottled water? tap water is cheaper and more environmentally responsible. - Stephanie
Suggestion
Plastic bottle deposit on sodas and soft drinks. 5 cents. How many soda machines are there on campus? And what is the cost to put a recycling barrel next to each machine, or in the lobby of each building? Publish this location! Keep the plastic out of the landfill, and make some money to cover the barrel costs. - Anonymous
Suggestion
Addenda to the redeeming of plastic bottle deposits… why not use student volunteers to collect from each point? Thus reducing staff hours and cost. - Anonymous
Suggestion
I would have also clicked the radio button for “financial savings” for this suggestion. The City of San Francisco has, I believe, banned bottled water (the singles) in the City administration offices. Their ban was primarily a sustainability effort, but here at Cornell I think it could save a lot of money, as well. When refreshments are ordered for a meeting, it is just as easy (maybe easier) to get a large container of ice water instead of individual bottles. We could encourage staff to have their own water bottles.
A couple of years ago when I was volunteering at the Campus Services event, a family from Asia came up to me and asked me if it was safe to drink the water here. I assured them it was, but the comment puzzled me. After a time, I realized that a visitor could easily draw that conclusion - so many people were carrying water bottles and there were bubblers available as well. - Judy
Suggestion
Eliminate the use of plastic water bottles with the Cornell seal, except for outdoor events when dehydration is a factor. Instead, use pitchers of water and refillable cups and glasses. This will also generate financial savings. - Diane
Suggestion
Some way to capture excess items in labs, offices where other units or possible general public could buy them or reuse them elsewhere. We as a university throw away alot of stuff that could be used by other units or other people in Tompkins and surrounding counties. For example, nuts, bolts, steel in labs. Construction materials, office furniture and office supplies just to name a few. Could we have a database or a Cornell freecycle, sell it on ebay as the government is now doing. I know we’re nonpofit org and that may get complicated but we have alot of smart minds around we could for sure figure out the best way to reduce, reuse and recycle rather than adding to the landfill. - Anonymous
Suggestion
An internal “freecycle” might eliminate duplication and waste. Why throw out a perfectly good item that another department might use? - Christa
Suggestion
Please provide recycling/disposal bins at major points on campus for used batteries and cell phones. I know I should recycle these but it’s not easy to figure out where to take them. If the recycling bins are located near the major libraries and eating locations then it will make it easier for people to recycle/dispose of them in the proper place and keep them out of landfills. - Anonymous
Suggestion
The Lab of Ornithology has been successfully composting our food waste for about a year now. We were recently recognized for our efforts by Sustainable Tompkins. To reduce trash collection and to enhance our sustainability I suggest we implement composting in other office areas. Our staff and students are beginning to compost in the dining units. Many people eat their lunches in their offices or home buildings they should have the opportunity to enhance their personal gardens or at least do the right thing by turning their apple core and their tea bag into nutrient rich compost. - Jacalyn
Suggestion
There should be far more recycling bins provided for returnable plastics, and more resources for them to be emptied regularly. There is only one such bin in my building and it is always overflowing. If it is emptied more regularly, and there are more around the building, recycling these items will be encouraged. Additionally, the bins should be placed right next to existing trash cans - for many having to walk just a few feet further is too much inconvenience and the item will instead be thrown into the trash. - Anonymous
Suggestion
I believe we should follow SUNY’s example on how to reuse unnecessary equipment on campus and also generate income for the University.
Each SUNY location sends an electronic notification to the other SUNY schools to identify their equipment available for transfer (This would be similar to Cornell using its CATS system to let the Cornell community know what capital and non-capital equipment is available).
If an internal source is not identified that needs the merchandise, SUNY in Albany requests the SUNY school provide a detailed description of the item(s) and a photo as well. SUNY then posts the items available through Ebay as an auction item. At the end of the auction, payment must be made to SUNY in Albany directly, SUNY then contacts the school/dept letting them know the item(s) will be picked up by the winner at their location within a specific number of days. Failure to pick up the merchandise on time can lead to forfeiture of the items and no refunds are given.
Thanks, Steve
Suggestion
Forget the trays in the all-you-can-eat dining halls! Without trays, we take only what we can handle on one plate at a time. This will reduce food waste as we often find that what our eyes initially indulge is more than our stomach can handle. I know many people who will take two plates of food and only eat about one plate’s worth. Of course they continue doing so because buffet style means they’re not paying any more or any less for it.
When Cornell Dining sees that less food is being wasted by the students, they can cut back on their production, eventually saving money for an enterprise that needs to lift itself from the negatives. - Diana
Suggestion
Trillium always gives out these black plastic containers that seem to be recyclable, but there isn’t any way to recycle them other than carrying them around all day and taking them home with me to recycle there. Because of this inconvenience, these containers are most often used for one meal, then thrown in the trash. A bin should definitely be added for these containers so they won’t be thrown out by customers all the time!
Also, it appears that the employees who clean the tables always throw newspapers that are left behind into the trash. If they left them on the table after wiping them down, the newspapers can be reread by other diners and not as many will end up in the trash. (Ideally, they should be recycled!) - Melissa
Suggestion
Get compostable cup tops and straws so that everything can go into the compost. Make composting a requirement for events. Have dining educate departments on how to do that - where pick up locations for compost trash are. - Beth
Suggestion
Recycle more plastic containers - that come with lab ware, and some with chemicals. - Beth

Reduce Paper

Suggestion
Make the Cornell Chronicle an on-line ‘paper” and save the printing, distribution, and disposal costs. - Joan
Suggestion
In the interest of making the most of our paper usage, for interoffice paperwork that is not sensitive, use recycled paper (the blank side) to post memos-flyers-notes that need to be printed. Then once the paper is finished in its circulation cycle, send it to the recycle bin.
In the effort to streamline accounting, is it possible to have all Account Reps and BSC Reps attend a training (all together) that specifies procedures for P-Card and Journal back up. I have noticed some confusion about this (myself included) and this often causes unneeded paper usage.
Thank you for opening this up to a grass roots effort! - Stephanie
Suggestion
I have a suggestion about not only sustainability but also financial savings
I feel that the amount of fliers, letters and other mass mailings that are sent out through Campus Mail should no longer be distributed this way, but, via e-mail since the whole University has e-mail access. Unless it is something that is personalized. And, these could be done through e-mail also and be printed out by the individual person if they chose to do so.
I work in the mail room at the Lab of Ornithology and I have had a number of the above mentioned come across my desks to be sorted and deliver to the almost 200 faculty, staff and students affiliated with the Lab of O.
This wastes paper and ink and on top of that it is a waste of time and energy that could be spent better on other tasks.
I feel that this would be a very positive change for Cornell and a wonderful step in the direction of sustainability.
Thank you for your time - Loretta
Suggestion
I have heard that the double-sided NetPrint printers charge as much per print as the non-double-sided printers. It might encourage students to choose the double-sided option if its price were reduced. - Anonymous
Suggestion
I fully support minimizing or eliminating paper distribution of notices or ads. I recommend that if these are moved to the e-mail system, that a subject line preface be required so they can be easily filtered into a separate mailbox to be reviewed periodically and not become part of the work flow. - Anonymous
Suggestion
Is a printed campus directory needed? A lot of paper is wasted by printing it if is never gets used. How many people, besides me, use the electronic directory exclusively. Seems like cost savings as well. - Erin
Suggestion
Instead of using paper towels to dry off my dishes in our office kitchen, I now keep a cotton dish towel in my office and take it home to wash weekly. Not only is this more sustainable than using paper towels but, estimating conservatively, Cornell could save over $60,000 a year (aprx. $17 per person) if only 1/4 of faculty and staff used 6 less paper towels a day. - Barbara
Suggestion
Just received a letter in the mail at home regarding use of funds that I had put away in Select Benefits for medical expenses. I had already put in the claims for all of the funds available. As a result this notice was not necessary in my case & I assume quite a few others - not sure how easy it would be to check this before getting a notice together. It also would be best to email (they could ask for a “receipt of email”) to be sure the person got it but this would save on printing,paper, stuffing, envelopes, postage.
We also get other mailings (typically from HR) that it seems should come to Cornell addresses at work rather than home to save on these mailings. - Anonymous
Suggestion
It is easy to say go paperless… How is sometimes harder to pinpoint.
If your office has a whiteboard or a blackboard in the conference room… Write the agenda for meetings on the white board. Let the folks in the office know that each of them doesn’t need to print out the agenda.
How many of us have a USB jump drive already? Why hand out stacks of paper at a meeting/class/conference/presentation when the items could be downloaded to a USB drive?
If your office has a newsletter - consider placing it on the web.
For course packages: instead of copying materials, scan the items. This way they can be uploaded to the web, or downloaded to the students computers. (Are we already doing this?) - Anonymous
Suggestion
Update the DDD (deans, department heads, directors) mailing lists and reduce mailings of colorful, cardstock type reports. I have been at the University for 20 years and I still get mailings of these items under multiple job titles. Mailings should be minimized and selective. - Renee
Suggestion
I’d suggest eliminating or drastically reducing the number of paper copies of the Cornell paper directory and Verizon phone books distributed on campus and moving Courses of Study entirely online. Thank you for soliciting and responding to these suggestions. - Ann
Suggestion
This is both a sustainable category, and possibly a financial savings category (I’m an alum employee from the natural resources/comm departments, so sustainable usage/reducing waste is of interest to me).
Cornell needs to strengthen its commitment to automating its processes and moving towards a paperless environment as much as possible.
I’ve been in my current department for over a year, and during that time, under my previous supervisor (who recently left; hence things have reverted to other management), never had to fill out on paper a vacation request form, which in this unit (Statler Hotel School) is done by triplicate. I suspect HR doesn’t really care that much if this has slipped by the entire time, and is only now being done again….but why are these things lingering in an electronic world?
I’ve been here 15 years as an employee and have not had to fill out a paper form before for making a vacation request. In this electronic world, we either email our vacation requests, have them approved verbally or in writing via email, and then the time usage is of course logged in Kronos or Colts. Some of the payroll staff in my early years (I’m talking early to mid 90s) were still using paper trails for other things, but in general much of the electronic payroll system was already in place (whether via manual input or timecards).
The Statler HR office is still using these triplicate forms for time away requests. They also make employees fill out punch-edit slips (we have a time clock here) every time one forgets to punch in or out. For non-bargaining unit employees, who have access to their timecards via Colts or Kronos, this is not necessary as they input their own time and the supervisor obviously has to approve it every payperiod, as happens all over campus.
For bargaining unit employees (many of whom are not comfortable with computer skills), I can understand where this may be necessary, especially if the union is involved, to have a paper record. But for admin and student staff, and managerial employees, why is all this paper necessary? Triplicate time away forms *and* punch edit slips when all the work is also inputted electronically? Is there a mistrust of the IT department and its back-up mechanism?
When was the last time people have seen triplicate forms (beyond antiquated government offices?)? The 50s, 60s, 70s? Why are we spending money ordering these things, and wasting paper to boot?
These triplicate forms, when possible, should be used for scrap paper and then never ordered again. This should be looked at all over campus. Either we trust our IT departments to keep the required back-ups, or train our workforce to become more comfortable using computers. It’s almost a point of citizenship to be computer-literate (and aware of all the pitfalls and benefits thereof) in the 21st century.
I can think of dozens of other ways that paper is overused at Cornell. I know it’s recycled (although I mistrust whether it’s reused again)….but I imagine IT departments - and employees with creative and strong computer skills who are unafraid to learn even more about computer programs, can find ways to automate even more of Cornell’s paperbound processes. - Anonymous
Suggestion
Follow up on Erin’s comment about the staff directory:
In a recent call to Publications & Marketing, they couldn’t promise when the directory would be distributed despite the fact that we’re already half way through the academic year. By the time we do receive copy, some information may be out-of-date or incomplete.
Not to blame anyone for the extended delay as it is beyond their control; however, it does highlight the fact that the directory can’t be distributed before mid-fall even under the best of conditions.
Question and Proposal: How many users revert to the Web or Eudora instead of the print directory, to look up someone’s contact information? Some of my coworkers, for example, rely on the Web more than the hard copy. Could Cornell, therefore, survey faculty, students, and staff to assess their use of the existing paper

directory and to gauge their interest in converting to an online one?
Scenario: If the majority say they’d prefer an electronic version, then base a reduced production/distribution on that response. Then in spring 2010, conduct a second survey to measure effectiveness and a cost benefit analysis. If the online system wins out, this method would keep data current and could save Cornell considerable amounts of paper and expense. - Anonymous

Suggestion
Stop printing Courses of Study. It is out of date the minute it goes to press. The online version is a much more widely used publication, and is regularly updated.
The process for editing the Courses of Study should also be explored when time allows. My staff go through 3 edits (often resubmitting changes they submitted during the first cycle), and because our degrees are offered across 2 and 3 colleges, they are having to meet various deadlines that don’t take one another into consideration. (ie: the schedules and deadlines of each college are different).
Thank you for the opportunity to so easily send suggestions and for the open lines of communication. - Jennifer
Suggestion
I really think Cornell Library should reduce operational paper usage.
I work part time at Olin library, and there are many, as I see, unnecessary paper usage. One big component is the paper used when transferring a book from one library site and another. For instance, if someone returns a Uris book at Olin, when I discharge it, a page is printed out with bold ‘uris library’ and the book information on it. After the book transferred to Uris, the page is just tossed to dust bin(though it’s recycle). Thinking of how many books are transferring within the libraries of Cornell a day, one better method may greatly reduce paper usage. I believe there are still more such wastes, such as call slips, request slip… These ‘one-time’ paper could be saved.
I have talked to Asso. University Librarian Janet A. McCue about this initiative, and we are closely working on this issue. Considering the potential savings that this idea would promise, I think it is worth the administration’s attention to push it forward. - Yuan
Suggestion
It’s very convenient to return library books to any library. However, if you haven’t worked behind the scenes, you wouldn’t realize that we use a full sheet of paper for each book that needs to be sent to the correct destination. This sheet has the book’s name, bar code, and the name of the library to which it belongs—a few notes that should not take a whole page and all that ink.
While library admin tries to figure out a way to use less paper for all books not returned to its actual library (of which there are many), WE, AS BORROWERS, CAN MAKE AN EFFORT TO RETURN BOOKS TO THEIR PROPER HOMES! - Diana
Suggestion
The official Cornell letterhead templates have a “safety area” or left margin of 2 inches.
http://cornelllogo.cornell.edu/print/style_guide.pdf - pages 21, 23–31
This seems to be designed simply to make the Cornell seal logo stand out, but it is probably wasting a lot of paper. It’s hard for me to believe Cornell’s identity depends on sending out large sections of blank paper.
On the other hand, if it will cost a fortune to have a designer redesign the templates or print new letterhead, it may not be worth it financially. - Anonymous
Suggestion
Why not let people choose whether or not they receive a paper copy of the Cornell directory? My office just got 7 of them and we only need one, if any. There could be a check box in the Electronic Directory section of WhoIAm. - Laura
Suggestion
Make the paper telephone directories opt-in.
I see piles of them sitting around for months after they are available and then they get recycled or dumped. Based on what I’ve seen I wouldn’t be surprised if thousands go unclaimed. The info is all available online and that is how most people access it anyway.
How about everyone gets an email when they are going to be printed and can ask for a copy (or more perhaps for a fee, as appropriate) and then you only print what is needed/wanted with a few extra. - Jase
Suggestion
Thank you for encouraging everyone to limit print communications and move to digital only. I hope that this initiative will have real support at the highest level of the University, both in terms of clear policy and technological support. In the last year, as our office has tried to move towards digital communications only, we have encountered 2 major problems: the many “gatekeepers” (registrars etc.) who have access to current e-mail lists of students, faculty and staff are unwilling to use their lists to forward messages to our audience, and although we have tried to create attractive digital messages (similar to what we used to send out in paper) we have discovered that the bulk email systems used across campus (such as DUST) are old and cannot handle html-enabled e-mail (i.e graphics, track-backs etc).
If going e-only is going to work, every group on campus that used to send print materials needs an easy and equally attractive way of contacting their audiences digitally. In a university of Cornell’s size, one central division (historically, the registrar) should be tasked with collecting e-mails and and keeping contact information up-to-date. Whichever division maintains the information should provide easy ways for other groups on campus to access the lists to send communications to pre-specified groups (for example, asking that a message go to “all graduate students in department X”). Previously, we had been able to go to several places such as the registrar or dean of the college, and ask that our e-mails be sent to a specified group. However, in the past year several of these groups have refused to forward our messages for reasons which are unclear to me. This has resulted in us having to create our own lists, a time consuming process and a duplication of effort already done.
As we move increasingly online, I understand that the central agency which has the ability to send out bulk e-mail may be concerned about “spamming” people or over-zealous e-mail requests. But cutting off digital access while the university as a whole is eliminating print is nonsensical. If e-mail overload is a concern, why not create a university-wide policy regarding what can and can not be forwarded to students, faculty and staff? Furthermore, a good central database which allows senders to filter by department, year, or university status would allow us to better target our e-mails to reach only the interested students, faculty and staff.
We need clear data policies and funding to revamp our aging bulk mail infrastructure if we are to achieve your goal of a digital communication system which is as good (or hopefully better) than our current method. Many departments like mine have put time and energy into creating digital materials, but have been stymied by a refusal to share access and an antiquated infrastructure. - Anonymous

Reduced Work Week

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Telecommuting

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Transportation

Suggestion
This is likely to be an unpopular suggestion, but the University could decrease congestion and raise additional revenue simply by increasing the fees for parking permits.
1) I am told that many areas are in high demand and have waiting lists; increasing the fee for these areas would actually make it easier for new faculty or staff to find a spot by decreasing demand.
2) Adding even a small fee for A-lot permits would reduce congestion and raise extra revenue. To control the financial impact on staff of limited means, the fee could be “added back” to compensation for the lowest-paid of Cornell’s employees. - Ralph
Suggestion
Extend Omnipass bus service to all faculty, staff and students. Would not need to add or maintain parking lots, would save considerable land, money, carbon. Short term expense for buses, long term financial and ecological gain. Don’t wait for “better times”; not doing this is costing us money now.
At least don’t reduce current support for mass transportation; that would be the ultimate administrative error and false economy. - Dan
Suggestion
Seems to me that the extremely large TCAT buses that ply our campus are unnecessary. They are rarely close to being filled and no matter how hybridized or fueled by natural gas, smaller buses could operate at less cost. Moreover, the buses we have interfere with efficient flow of other traffic. These buses require other vehicles to yield, and block traffic in all directions, when turning at intersections. They are designed for efficient use in large cities where roads are wider and fewer turns necessary; they are not effective in Ithaca. - John
Suggetion
Would it be possible to encourage Cornell staff not keep trucks idling when performing various jobs? Grounds keepers routinely do this, as do folks who check meters, repair parking gates, drop off food from Cornell catering etc. It seems like it would be both a good source of savings as well as a huge environmental plus! Thanks. - Anonymous
Suggestion
Let’s shut off public traffic from College Town to campus soon (buses can still run). The amount of traffic on campus is truly discouraging and detracting. Cornell has one of the most beautiful campuses in the nation, indeed in the world, but it is so overrun by traffic that it is difficult to appreciate the beauty.
I have visited UPenn, Penn State, UC Berkley, UC Davis, and Oregon State in the last 18 months or so and none of those campuses have the traffic problem that Cornell has. Tower Rd. is like a free-way at times!
Why not highlight the beauty of our campus instead of opening up it to all kinds of transportation. A significant portion of the traffic from College Town is students rushing to class or non-Cornellians riding through campus ( a colleague of my wife who works with her at Belle Sherman rides through campus on her way back and forth to her home in Renwick Heights daily). Let’s just have buses and campus vehicles have access to central campus and keep all other traffic in the parking garage or in the lots at the periphery of campus. - Bill
Suggestion
Let’s reduce the traffic on Tower Rd. by eliminating the “temporary” parking on the Ag Quad where the old Stone Hall used to be. How long is that eye sore going to be with us! Now the traffic is going out by the Plant Science building! Come on! How tacky is that!
Also, all the parking along Tower Rd (N permit) has seriously damaged the oak trees there. Compare the oak trees on the south side of Tower Rd. with the ones on the North side and you’ll see what I mean. Plus you are making people pay over $700 (N permit) for a permit to park on the south side of Tower Rd. that most of the time can’t be plowed so it is quite slippery and dangerous footing in the winter. Before Cornell is sued because someone has fallen there, let’s do the campus and the oak trees a favor and eliminate parking there. They can park down below in the paved area although I hated to see that parking lot added to Alumni Field there about 20 years ago. - Bill
Suggestion
I currently pay for a garage pass, which means if I take the bus it would be $3.00/day. To get free bus I must turn in my garage pass but can’t use the garage. The cost of the garage pass isn’t an issue if the bus isn’t an additional expense. If the garage pass was also a bus pass it could be used for either, not at the same time. - Anonymous
Suggestion
Why not allow faculty or staff to pay a single annual fee that would allow them to either park a car or ride the bus? This plan would offer participants both flexibility as well as an economic incentive to those individuals who must drive to work at certain times but who also wish to take the bus at other times. Currently, those individuals must pay an extra fee to ride the bus and are thus penalized financially. A single fee should help to reduce campus traffic and pollution. - Dorothy

Tuition

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Contact Suggestions

308 Day Hall
Cornell University
Ithaca, NY 14853

p. 607.255.9929